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[A] Beijing has a replica cafe from what American TV series?
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April 1, 2019
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Zack Creach
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5 Architectural Wonders to See in China

China is a land rich in history and mystery. It is full of both ancient wonders and modern technology, making it a fascinating place to visit. It is also home to some incredible buildings, some of which have been standing for centuries, in spite of the fact that they do not appear to have been built to last (see number 2 on this list for an example). If you are planning to take a tour of some of the most fascinating constructions in China, here are five architectural wonders you just can't miss.

5. Shenzhen Bao’an International Airport

Credit: c8501089/iStockphoto

The recently expanded Shenzhen Bao’an International Airport in Shenzhen is a futuristic marvel the likes of which most people have never seen. Designed by Studio Fuksas, a Rome-based architectural firm, Terminal 3 of this building/sculpture has been made to resemble a manta ray. It was designed to look as if it was formed and shaped by the wind itself, with both internal and external "skin" that looks like a white honeycomb. This honeycomb texture allows the light from outside to filter in, giving the 1-mile-long and 260-foot-high terminal quite a dazzling look.

4. Forbidden City

Credit: Zhao jian kang/Shutterstock

Don't let the name fool you: this "city" isn't actually a city at all. In fact, it is one enormous ancient palace. Covering more than 7 million square feet, the Forbidden City has more than 10,000 rooms. It has been home to more than 24 emperors and their families, and was forbidden to the public for several hundred years after construction began in the 1400s. The punishment for trespassing into this palace (which was made to represent God's own Heavenly palace) was beheading, but luckily for us, the 20th century saw the Forbidden City open up to everyone—and all visitors get to keep their heads (phew).

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