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[A] In which city did the Oregon Trail end?
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April 1, 2019
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Zack Creach
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5 Historical Places to Visit in Oregon

Some of you reading this may not have spent most of your elementary and middle school computer classes playing Oregon Trail on floppy disks on the school computers, but those of you who did will know already that Oregon is full of history that dates back to a time when the first settlers were just spreading out across America. Here is a look at five historical places to visit in Oregon if you want to get a deeper understanding of how important this state is.

5. Bonneville Lock and Dam

Credit: BurneyImageCreator/iStock

The Bonneville Lock and Dam was built by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in 1938 to both improve travel on the Columbia and Snake Rivers and to provide hydropower to America's Pacific Northwest. Not only is this dam a sight to see with its sheer size and intriguing design, but it also helps the community (and the country) by managing potential flooding, generating power, improving the habitats of fish and other wildlife, and monitoring water quality.

4. Crater Lake Superintendent's Residence

Credit: Laura Soulliere Harrison/Wikimediacommons

The Crater Lake Superintendent's Residence was built as a home for the superintendent of Crater Lake National Park in the 1930s. It is a beautiful, rustic house with walls crafted from stone, making it fit right in in the middle of that woodsy, natural space. Today, the superintendent no longer lives here, but visitors can go inside and visit the National Park's Science and Learning Center, complete with meeting spaces and a library.

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